Some Amazon Employees Now Only Have To Work 30 Hours A Week Because Life Isn’t Fair

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Some Amazon Employees Now Only Have To Work 30 Hours A Week Because Life Isn't Fair

Amazon is reportedly experimenting with a program that allows some employees to clock in for just 30 hours a week, according to The Washington Post.

The Seattle-based company, known for its miserable work culture, will keep these employees on salary, but reduce their pay 25 percent. A number of employees will test out the new program, designed to keep them in the office Monday through Thursday but cut them loose on Friday. A three-day weekend every weekend — it’s the postgrad dream.

From The Washington Post:

The program will have a few technical teams made up entirely of part-time workers. These 30-hour employees will be salaried and receive the same benefits as traditional 40-hour workers, but they will receive only 75 percent of the pay full-time workers earn. Currently, the company employs part-time workers that share the same benefits as full-time workers. However, the pilot program would differ in that an entire team, including managers, would work reduced hours.

“We want to create a work environment that is tailored to a reduced schedule and still fosters success and career growth,” states a posting by the company on for an informational seminar. “This initiative was created with Amazon’s diverse workforce in mind and the realization that the traditional full-time schedule may not be a ‘one size fits all’ model.”

Work less, make less — but it still comes with bennies. What say you, PGPers? Would you be willing to sacrifice 25 percent of your pay if it meant every Friday you didn’t have to go to work?

Would you sacrifice 25 percent of your pay to only work 30 hours a week?

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Fridays are usually pretty relaxed for me, so I’m not sure I’d welcome the change. But for those of you that hate your office regardless of what day it is, maybe you’d bite at this offer.

Amazon is trying to repair its image after a New York Times piece last year reported that the company encouraged employees to work up to 80 hours a week and never go on vacation. An employment expert from Columbia University said that article did major damage from an employee recruitment standpoint. But maybe a 30-hour work week is a bit of an overcorrection?

Regardless, a break from the traditional 40-hour work week is always welcome. I’ve had this coming Labor Day circled on my calendar for months. I’d love this feeling every week.

[via Washington Post]

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