Your Job Is Never Going To Inspire You All Of The Time, So It’s Time To Grow Up

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Your Job Is Never Going Inspire You All The Time, So It's Time To Grow Up

This is my warning to all of you:

If you have freshly post-grad acquaintances, for the love of god don’t add them on Facebook.

Learn from my mistakes. One of my best friends from college recently started dating a girl who is not even 22. On one hand, props to him because she’s still been able to reap the benefits of a free gym membership and her hope hasn’t been crushed by a cubicle quite yet. But on the other… it’s my opinion that her hope needs to be crushed a little bit.

I made the huge mistake of clicking “friend” when said new girlfriend and her shiny hair and shiny smile added me on Facebook. And then, I was promptly subjected to all of the pictures she shares of her posing with a skinny arm at various concerts, the Instagrams she links to of her attempts to being a foodie, and all the events she’s “interested” in.

But worst of all? Oh, worst of all are the articles she shares.

Recently, Elite Daily (the vortex for every special snowflake with wanderlust and an entitlement complex) published this piece about how if your job doesn’t ~ inspire ~ you, you absolutely need to quit. It’s filled with advice like, “Would you rather stay in your job based on fear or based on the desire and passion you have growing inside you for it?” and, “The reality with this is, if you’re no longer passionate about your work and stay simply because you’re comfortable, then you won’t be challenged in the right ways.”

And, of course, this girl shared it with a caption along the lines of, “What I’m telling myself every day in the real world!! Love you all!!”

Here’s the thing. This is all very idealistic and seemingly good advice for the life we should aspire to have. Of course, in a dream scenario, we’d all wake up every morning with a spring in our step while a chorus of Wham! singing “Wake Me Up Before You Go-Go” provided a musical background on our picture-perfect commute montage. Those 8+ hours we spend at work would fly by every single day and we’d always feel appreciated and never overworked and appropriately challenged but never overwhelmed. I get it. I get the dream.

But we don’t live in a dream. We live in reality.

The problem with this Elite Daily piece is that while it aims to keep people away from failure, it’s actually setting them towards it. Your goal shouldn’t be, “All inspiration all the time!” Your goal should be some semblance of balance between being fiscally responsible and still happy.

I have my quote unquote dream job, and there are still days where the idea of reading one more marketing pitch and having one more conference call with a particularly high-maintenance client makes me seriously consider Into the Wild-ing myself. I love what I do but still have tasks (like overseeing our social media for example) that I don’t feel particularly challenged or “inspired” by. But my feelings? My feelings don’t matter when it comes to work. If your main priority for a career is how it makes you “feel” you’re going to end up FEELING disappointed more often than not.

The reality is, even a dream job is still a job. It will have days that are amazing and filled with #blessed and humble brag “Look what I get to do and call it work!!” moments, and it will have days where you feel like pulling a Peter Gibbons and just saying “Screw ALL of this.” There will be parts of your job you love, and parts that you absolutely loathe. But inspiration isn’t synonymous with “loving every minute of every day” and if that’s what you’re waiting for? You’re going to be waiting forever.

So to all of the people with bright and shiny, “I’m going to live this life!!” hope out there:

A) Good for you.
B) Let me know when you get over it.

Because when you get over it, that’s when you’ll be hirable.

And until you get over it? Do me a solid and don’t add me on Facebook.

Image via YouTube

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