The Anatomy Of Your Scramble Team

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The Anatomy Of Your Scramble Team

If you’re like me, you love a good scramble. There are few things better than spending a day away from all the bullshit on the course with friends and a cooler full of cold ones. For those of you who don’t know, a scramble is a team golf game where all four members tee off and you choose the best ball from there. Then all four members hit from the best ball location and this pattern is follow until the ball is holed.

When scrambling, there’s a huge difference between having a “good” team and a “fun” team. When selecting a fun team, you have to find a delicate balance between having a drunken blast on the course while also ensuring you’re not going to walk into the clubhouse as the laughing stock of the tournament.

The Greenhorn

This guy is cool as hell. He’s the chillest of the bunch and meshes the group together. But he’s a beginner and has only been playing for about two years while he is still finding his swing. He’s got the ability to smoke that 4-iron about 200 yards down the middle but also has the game to knock a 4-foot putt twenty feet by the hole. This is your leadoff man on the green and your last option on the tee. On 15 of 18 greens, he’ll give you a great read and only miss because he didn’t putt it where you lined him up, but he’s done his job and shown you the line.

Due to his novice nature, he’s passive aggressive and hates making decisions, so you’ll hear him chirp at you if you’re not playing his ball. Great guy, but only a good team member.

The Hammer

This guy came for two reasons and two reasons only: to crush beers and crush drives. He’s the big swingin’ dick of the group. This guy crushes it; just absolutely obliterates the ball. You don’t always know where it’s going, but if it’s straight, you know you’ll be sitting pretty.

When everyone’s putting, he’ll be the guy relaxing on the fringe with two Miller Lites in one hand and a putter in the other. Yeah, you may need him to power in a couple putts, but at the end of the day, he’s purely there to go long and get you inside that 150-yard stake in the middle of the fairway.

The Short Fuse

This guy is funny as hell but has the temper of a bull. One second, he’s cracking jokes and farting in people’s backswings. The next, he’s screaming at ongoing traffic that interrupted him when lining up a putt. All of his emotions come out on the course.

He’ll tell you he’s about a 6 handicap when in all reality he plays to about a 12. A decent golfer but just thinks he’s way better than he truly is. He’ll help on most holes but is always one chunk away from going absolutely ape shit until he gets it together on the next tee box. A loose cannon, he’ll finish the day with fourteen clubs, two broken wedges, and a dinged up Scotty Cameron. Every once in a while, you give him an emotion-saving mulligan that goes un-talked about when handing your scorecard in after the round.

The Scratch Golfer

With this guy, your team goes from being classified as “solid” to being described as a “contender.” Without him, you’re just out there to have fun. But when this stud shows up, all of the sudden you’re eyeing the trophy in front of the locker room. He doesn’t play as much as he likes anymore after fizzling out in college, but he’s still capable of carrying a team now that he’s just a weekend warrior.

Sure, there are holes where he won’t contribute, but those are few and far between because it’s never due to one of his bad shots. It’s because all the other guys got lucky at the exact same time. He’s good, he knows he’s good, and the team knows he’s good. But he doesn’t act like it. He rarely makes mistakes and truly carries the team when no one can manage to put it within 30 feet of the pin when they’re sitting pretty 100 yards out. Last to putt, he’s saving your pars when you should be in the clubhouse with a bogey.

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The account photo is not mine and my thoughts and words do not represent the thoughts and words of Sir Chevrolet Chase or National Lampoons. I'm not here for a long time. I'm just here for a ... no I'm just here.

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