If You’re In A Dry Spell, You Now Have a Disability According To The World Health Organization

Email this to a friend

Favorite

If You're In A Dry Spell, You Now Have a Disability According to The World Health Organization

I haven’t been feeling right lately. Irritable. Stressed. Highly strung. On edge. It’s been brutal, so I went to a shrink, to analyze my dreams, and she said it’s lack of sex that’s bringing me down. Turns out all that hokie voodoo was just diagnosing what the World Health Organization is now recognizing as a disability: the inability to find a suitable sexual partner.

Well, if the inability to get laid is a disability, I’m disabled to the point of medically-induced coma.

Until now, infertility – the failure to achieve pregnancy after 12 months or more of regular unprotected sex – was not considered a disability.

But now in dramatic move the World Health Organisation will change the standard to suggest that a person who is unable to find a suitable sexual partner or is lacking a sexual relationship to have children – will now be equally classified as disabled.

WHO says the change will give every individual “the right to reproduce”.

Does commercial insurance cover escort services? No? Thanks Obama. Guess I’ll have to do what I’ve been doing: soldiering on with a brave face and keep settling for – at best – unsuitable sexual partners.

You don’t know courage until you’ve lived like a catfish, scraping the sticky floor of a dark bar at 1:59 a.m. with a chisel just hoping to find a cure for a WHO-recognized disability, but ultimately ending up childless and alone.

I am a little curious to see how the “right to reproduce” with a “suitable sexual partner” pick up line goes over with 11/10 Dante’s Inferno level smokes shows. What’s the worst that could happen? I’m already disabled. “Hey girly, I have my rights.”

This is actually kind of a controversial stance taken by WHO, because what this means is that single men and women, as well as gay couples, now will have – in theory – the same level of access to IVF as couples who have been trying to have kids but cannot.

Under the new rules, heterosexual single men and women and gay men and women who want to have children will now be given the same priority as a couple seeking IVF because of medical fertility problems. But critics branded the new laws as “absurd nonsense” arguing that the organisation has overstepped the mark by moving into social matters rather than health.

Really interesting article, actually, with good dialogue from both sides of the debate. But I’m not taking a stance here. I’m just trying to take little Max to pay dirt this weekend with someone the WHO – or at least my brunch crew – will consider suitable.

Image via Shutterstock

[via The Express]

Email this to a friend

Favorite

Log in or create an account to post a comment.

Click to Read Comments (22)