How To Be A Young Dad On Father’s Day

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How To Be A Young Dad On Father's Day

Before your days as a dad, Father’s Day is a completely different animal. You get your old man a card, possibly buy him an actual gift if you aren’t making shit money. Hopefully, you get to spend some quality time with him, maybe on the course, or just hanging out at home. If that isn’t possible, you drop him a line to make sure he knows he’s the greatest damn dad on the planet. It’s a day to shine some light on the guy you look up to the most and do whatever will let the guy have a good Sunday. Although, if he’s a heavy gambler with money on the last round of the Open, maybe just kinda give him some space.

Once you’ve got a kid (or kids) of your own, the game changes quite a bit. Those first couple Father’s Days are a little different than the days of your past. You’re still calling your old man, and hopefully seeing him, but now it’s about you and your own offspring. Up until Father’s Day, as a young man, there really isn’t any day that’s your own.

Your birthday isn’t shit after 21, unless you’re that pumped about your insurance going down at 25. I also doubt anyone reading this article can celebrate President’s Day (Although Barack, if you’re reading follow me on Twitter, fam). Unless you made the brave decision to join the armed forces and can get some pats on the back via Veteran’s Day, Father’s Day is the first day that’s yours again, so do it right.

First, remember why you’re being called “Best Dad Ever” by some little kid who looks like you. Yeah, Father’s Day is your day, but what makes you a good dad is that you enjoy being with your kid. If you’d rather spend your day away doing other shit for fun, that doesn’t make you a father; it makes you a sperm donor.

Just spend some time with the heir. Have a cookout, go to a ballgame, or shit, just hang out and watch TV and enjoy each other. You (hopefully) don’t have to work, and no matter the age of your offspring, it’s the one day where they are required by unofficial law to spend the day with the man who will teach them how to ride a bike and which shitty light beer is the best. Take advantage while you can.

That isn’t to say that you don’t get to treat yourself a bit. Maybe your kid is too young to golf, or maybe he’s just not interested. Go play a round with some buddies, because a couple hours to yourself is fine. You earned it.

And when you’re hanging with your kid, let them know that you enjoy being around them and doing what they like–but not on Father’s Day. Nah, you’re watching golf. Oh, and watching sports has been scientifically proven, by way of a complex study involving just me and my son, to be some of the greatest bonding experiences a parent and child can have.

If you’re lucky enough, you’ll get to hang with your kids and your own dad, but regardless, the most important thing about Father’s Day is to just appreciate it. You only get so many with your kids, especially when they’re young and have no option but to spend the day with you. Ideally, you’ll be able to crack a cold one with your dad while admiring your offspring doing incredible things, like feeding crayons to the dogs or dumping glue on the carpet, but even if it’s just you and the little ones, make sure to let your dad know that you’re grateful everything he taught you.

Enjoy your time with the little ones, take in just how lucky you are to be a dad, and share some peaceful time with your kids. And also, hope that whoever you picked to win the US Open pulls it off, or you’re out $250.

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